Monthly Archives: March 2018

Project 1: Space, depth and volume

This project starts with a background covered in charcoal and starts by drawing into this with a rubber and then adding more charcoal to produce images without outlines.

This is my favoured way of doing life drawing, so I started doing some of these:

Arms raised Back ChestHalf Hand Hands on hips Leg

I want to see if I can apply this to my sculpture work though, so the next step was to draw a completed sculpture in this way:

Decaying pollen photo Decaying pollen

This kind of works (colour plays quite a part in the sculpture, so black and white doesn’t capture that), but it doesn’t help me to develop the work.

I then tried a sculpture I haven’t (fully) made yet:

Nerve Cells

Obviously the lighting is made up on this sculpture as it doesn’t exist yet. The sculpture will be a wall hung relief work, but this looks more like an aerial view of a large scale work in the landscape. I’m also not sure it helps me to develop my work. At this stage, the nerve cell pieces are made, but I need to decide how to arrange them on the background. This is going to be much easier to do by moving the pieces around once they are made.

Reflection:

I am a big fan of this way of drawing and think it offers the best method of capturing a sense of depth and form.

This method of drawing doesn’t help me work on my current relief sculptures, but would help when looking at more all-round 3D works. For instance, this was how I ended up with this sculpture. I have gone in for a lot of relief sculptures lately and want to move back into more 3D in the round works, so this method might be more useful to employ with these works.

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Exhibition Visit – Truth and Fantasy, Skipton Town Hall

This was an exhibition of contemporary artist drawings, ranging from pencil/ink/charcoal drawings to objects and animation.

Paul Chiappe

Paul Chiappe

Responds to ‘found’ photographs and reproduces using pencil in incredible detail that makes it indistinguishable from a photograph. That shows great skill, but the interest comes from where he has altered them as if ‘photoshopping’ the images. ‘Untitled 2, 2005’ was particularly effective, a small image (maybe 50cm wide) akin to a black and white photograph of a school group, with the photographic like image for the front row, getting less detailed and down to a single outline at the back row of children.

Henri Gaudier-Brzeska

Henri Gaudier Brzeska

A very pared down image using just a few lines, but in those lines the expression of the people is captured perfectly.

Penny Davenport

Penny Davenport

Very detailed drawings from her imagination which must take a long time to complete. She had some nice use of line and stippling, although I didn’t find there to be enough variation in mark making to keep my interest.

Simon Woolham

Simon Woolham1 Simon Woolham 2

His drawings using just biro were very powerful. They use bold lines, or ruled lines fading out to produce graphic effects. They remind me a bit of Paul Nobel’s Nobtown drawings, but I prefer these ones as they leave more to the imagination.

Overall

A very interesting exhibition. Simon Woolham’s work made the biggest impression on me and I will try out some of his drawing methods.

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